April 3, 2019

Denver, CO – The Senate Education Committee today unanimously voted to advance SB19-170, Inquiry Into College Applicant Criminal History. The bill, sponsored by Senator Robert Rodriguez (D-Denver), would prohibit colleges and universities from asking applicants about their criminal or disciplinary histories. The bill now moves to the Committee of the Whole with a recommendation that it be placed on the consent calendar.

“Every Coloradan deserves a fair shot at success, and many times that means access to an advanced education. But too many Coloradans don’t get that shot at a bright future because of past mistakes that resulted in disciplinary action,” said Senator Rodriguez. “Banning the box on college applications will help many hardworking students clear a hurdle that many face through no fault of their own.”

Currently, 89 percent of colleges use information about applicants’ disciplinary history, which includes K-12 suspensions and expulsions, to make their admissions decision. SB19-170 would put an end to this practice in Colorado, helping institutions of higher education get a full picture of each student rather than immediately disqualifying someone with a childhood record.

“We know that when colleges ask to see criminal or disciplinary records, it has a disproportionate impact on children of color, LGBTQ youth, and students living in poverty,” said Senator Rodriguez. “This bill has bipartisan sponsorship, and I am hopeful that my colleagues in the Senate will come together to support it on the floor.”

SB19-170 would include an exception for convictions or disciplinary actions related to stalking, sexual assault, domestic violence.

For more information about this legislation, please visit https://leg.colorado.gov/bills/sb19-170.

Denver, CO – The Senate Education Committee voted today X-to-X to advance SB19-170, Inquiry Into College Applicant Criminal History. The bill, sponsored by Senator Robert Rodriguez (D-Denver), would prohibit colleges and universities from asking applicants about their criminal or disciplinary histories. The bill now moves to X for consideration.

“Every Coloradan deserves a fair shot at success, and many times that means access to an advanced education. But too many Coloradans don’t get that shot at a bright future because of past mistakes that resulted in disciplinary action,” said Senator Rodriguez. “Banning the box on college applications will help many hardworking students clear a hurdle that many face through no fault of their own.”

Currently, 89 percent of colleges use information about applicants’ disciplinary history, which includes K-12 suspensions and expulsions, to make their admissions decision. SB19-170 would put an end to this practice in Colorado, helping institutions of higher education get a full picture of each student rather than immediately disqualifying someone with a childhood record.

“We know that when colleges ask to see criminal or disciplinary records, it has a disproportionate impact on children of color, LGBTQ youth, and students living in poverty,” said Senator Rodriguez. “This bill has bipartisan sponsorship, and I am hopeful that my colleagues in the Senate will come together to support it on the floor.”

SB19-170 would include an exception for convictions or disciplinary actions related to stalking, sexual assault, domestic violence.
For more information about this legislation, please visit https://leg.colorado.gov/bills/sb19-170.

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